The Christian Science textbook, large type edition, by Rolf A. F. Witzsche

Science and Health with Key the Scriptures,
 by Mary Baker Eddy

Christian Science crown by Mary Baker Eddy
sublime science

Chapter 7 - - Physiology 


 Human stature



This embryonic and materialistic human belief called mortal man in turn fills itself with thoughts of pain and pleasure, of life and death, and arranges itself into five so-called senses, which presently measure mind by the size of a brain and the bulk of a body, called man.

Human birth, growth, maturity, and decay are as the grass springing from the soil with beautiful green blades, afterwards to wither and return to its native nothingness. This mortal seeming is temporal; it never merges into immortal being, but finally disappears, and immortal man, spiritual and eternal, is found to be the real man.

The Hebrew bard, swayed by mortal thoughts, thus swept his lyre with saddening strains on human existence:

As for man, his days are as grass:

As a flower of the field, so he flourisheth.

For the wind passeth over it, and it is gone;

And the place thereof shall know it no more.


When hope rose higher in the human heart, he sang:

As for me, I will behold Thy face in righteousness:

I shall be satisfied, when I awake, with Thy likeness...

For with Thee is the fountain of life;

In Thy light shall we see light.


The brain can give no idea of God's man. It can take no cognizance of Mind. Matter is not the organ of infinite Mind.

As mortals give up the delusion that there is more than one Mind, more than one God, man in God's likeness will appear, and this eternal man will include in that likeness no material element.



topic 64 - ending page 191


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Published by Cygni Communications Ltd. BC, Canada - (c) 2010 public domain; Rolf A. F. Witzsche