The Christian Science textbook, large type edition, by Rolf A. F. Witzsche

Science and Health with Key the Scriptures,
 by Mary Baker Eddy

Christian Science crown by Mary Baker Eddy
sublime science

Chapter 7 - - Physiology 


 Power of habit



The authentic history of Kaspar Hauser is a useful hint as to the frailty and inadequacy of mortal mind. It proves beyond a doubt that education constitutes this so-called mind, and that, in turn, mortal mind manifests itself in the body by the false sense it imparts. Incarcerated in a dungeon, where neither sight nor sound could reach him, at the age of seventeen Kaspar was still a mental infant, crying and chattering with no more intelligence than a babe, and realizing Tennyson's description:



An infant crying in the night,



An infant crying for the light,



And with no language but a cry.

His case proves material sense to be but a belief formed by education alone. The light which affords us joy gave him a belief of intense pain. His eyes were inflamed by the light. After the babbling boy had been taught to speak a few words, he asked to be taken back to his dungeon, and said that he should never be happy elsewhere. Outside of dismal darkness and cold silence he found no peace. Every sound convulsed him with anguish. All that he ate, except his black crust, produced violent retchings. All that gives pleasure to our educated senses gave him pain through those very senses, trained in an opposite direction.



topic 72 - ending page 195


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Published by Cygni Communications Ltd. BC, Canada - (c) 2010 public domain; Rolf A. F. Witzsche