Text and images transcript of the video Energy Forever - 2 Fusion and Biofuels by Rolf Witzsche 

Energy Forever - 2 Fusion and Biofuels

Click on the images for a larger view




Efforts to overcome the energy resource limits.




On the front of nuclear fusion power, not a single success has been achieved.

The main blocking factor is that it takes a large kinetic force of energy to overcome the electric repulsion of the nuclei that must fuse for power extraction to become possible.

The extremely strong electric repulsion between the fuel nuclei prevents their atoms from merging.

While it is possible to force the fuel atoms to merge, with massive external energy being applied, the output energy that is achieved from the forced fusion is too feeble to cover the input energy needs for the fusion to happen, much less to produce a net energy-gain.




Enormous efforts have been made in recent times to develop a workable process to actually produce usable nuclear fusion energy. A gigantic experimental device is presently built in Europe, the ITER, that will stand a quarter as high as the great pyramid in Egypt, to explore ways to overcome the inhibiting problems.

It is deemed that if the process could be made successful, it would create a new energy resource of near infinite abundance. The evidence on this front, however, tells us that this great effort that has been ongoing for decades already, is a dead-end pursuit. 




No naturally occurring nuclear-fusion energy production is happening anywhere in the universe. The principle for such an energy-production process doesn't exist, nor is it needed as the universe is flush with electric energy streams. 




Natural barriers against nuclear fusion exist instead that protect the universe from destroying itself. Nuclear fusion is an energy consuming process in the natural world, by which atoms are formed. Nuclear fusion is not an energy creating process. 




The vast flash of energy that is released by a thermonuclear bomb is not the product of nuclear fusion. It is the product of latent energy being released when two overbuilt isotopes, deuterium and tritium, are violently forced to fuse in such a manner that a neutron, which has been previously bound to their nuclei becomes unbound, because it has no longer a place in the resulting fused product. The energy that is released in this process is essentially the product of nuclear fission, which too, merely releases previously invested, talented energy.




Nuclear fusion energy production doesn't work for three reasons. The energy level of the neutron that is released, which is the usable energy, is 100 times greater than in normal nuclear reactors. The strong neutron flux destroys the fabric of the metals that the reactors are made of. It also makes the reactors intensely radioactive. This hugely damaging effect is great for nuclear bombs that are designed to kill people, but it makes the process inherently useless for power reactors. 




Also the required fusion-fuel isotopes, deuterium and tritium, are hard to produce. Deuterium exists in seawater in a highly diluted ratio so that it takes the processing of 600,000 tons of sea water to extract enough deuterium for one ton of fusion fuel that would, if the process was workable, power a one-gigawatt reactor for a year. In order to replicate the current electricity production by this process, 2,500 times as much water would have to be processed for the needed fuel each year. This would be a gigantic requirement, if not a prohibitive one.




For tritium, the fuel situation is worse. Tritium doesn't exist naturally at all. It needs to be bred from lithium-6 in nuclear fission reactors, in an extremely slow process. Also the numbers don't add up for this process to make sense. It takes 1 tritium atom to produce 1 neutron in a fusion reactor, while it takes 1 neutron, irradiating lithium-6, to produce 1 tritium atom for the new fuel. This means that no net energy gain is actually produced in this process. Also, lithium-6 is quite rare. A mere 7.5% of natural lithium is lithium-6. Attempts are made to breed the needed tritium directly in the fusion reactor itself, from lithium-7, but if one considers the shielding required for the project to be workable, a reasonable success is near impossible. Nor will it ever be possible to capture all the fusion-released neutrons for self-sustained breeding to be realized.




In addition, it takes more energy input to create the brute force to cause the fusion to happen, than the fusion process gives back. No net energy gain has yet been achieved.

While fusion burns have been achieved in some of the largest reactors, the fusion process itself has an inherent flaw, which all by itself makes fusion power impractical. The flaw is that the fusion process blows itself out for reasons that the fusion fuel is being diluted with the resulting fusion product. The longest burn-time to date that has been achieved, was about 1 second.




A different approach to nuclear fusion power utilizes light to compress a tiny sphere of fusion fuel (image 1) with such immense power that its atoms begin to fuse. The fuel is placed inside a small hollow capsule made of gold (image 2). It is irradiated with 192 beams of light inside the hollow capsule (image 3). The irradiation occurs inside a 30-foot target chamber (image 5), where the capsule is precisely positioned relative to the light beams (image 4). 500 trillion watts of light is applied to the target from 48 directions in a gigantic facility, larger than a sports stadium, named the National Ignition Facility (image 6). The facility contains 192 large lasers that are designed to compress the fuel sphere at a velocity of 370 Kilometers per second. 

When fusion will be accomplished, which has not been achieved to date, the fusion power produced will be roughly one tenth of the power input required to cause the fusion to happen. Should ignition be achieved in the future, the fusion burn will be extremely short in duration, in the range of nanoseconds, with a 20 hour cooling-off period required between shots. Actual commercial power production simply cannot be achieved on this basis. Nuclear fusion power is a concept that started with a dream and will remain a dream.




The entire concept will remain a dream forever, because even if all the technical barriers against the power-production process could be overcome by some magic, the key element in the process, which is its fuel cycle, makes the concept ultimately an impossible dream.

The entire nuclear-fusion power development project is built on the neutron-heavy deuterium-tritium fuel. This neutron-heavy fuel is the only fuel that can be made to fuse with a reasonable amount of energy input.




Since the tritium isotope is double neutron-heavy, it doesn't exist naturally. It can be artificially created in a fission reactor that produces free neutrons that can be applied to fission lithium into in helium and tritium. 

It is here where the fuel cycle breaks down. A fusion reactor cannot breed its own fuel. It can breed some of it by the fissioning of lithium-6, but not enough, because the fission process to produce the tritium requires as many neutrons for its input than the tritium in the fusion process generates. Because of neutron capture inefficiencies, uranium fission reactors will always be required for the supplemental breeding of the fusion fuel. 




Uranium-235 is the only natural element in existence on earth that emits free neutrons. Every nuclear power reactor on earth utilizes the atomic fission characteristic of uranium that releases free neutrons. No other efficient natural source for free neutrons exist other than U233, U235, and U239 as are presently used in nuclear power production, which has a highly limited fuel resource.




A large nuclear power station with a net electrical capacity of 1,300 MW requires about 210,000 kg of raw uranium per year as input for the fuel production. At the current rate of uranium consumption the reserves in presently operating mines will be exhausted in 20 years. Presently unused economic reserves can extend the uranium supply for another 80 years. It is assumed that as yet undiscovered resources may exist that could extend the supply for another 300 years, and it is further assumed that presently uneconomic ores might extend the supply for possibly as along as 1,500 years. In theory, the uranium supply can never be depleted. The rocks of the Earth, even sea water contain trace amounts of uranium. But for all practical purposes, such as for large-scale power production, uranium is a finite resource that will likely be depleted for practical applications in a hundred years.




While it is possible to fission lithium-7 to produce tritium, shown as Case 2, high-energy neutrons are required for the fission to be possible. While a fusion reactor does produce high-energy neutrons that would fission lithium-7, in practice the two cannot meet. The shielding that is required of the lithium against the high thermal-flux of fusion reactions exceeding 100 million degrees, requires shielding materials that block the fast neutrons that the lithium-7 fission requires. Those materials do not exist at the present. It might be possible to produce them in the future, though little hope exists.

And on top of all that, the critical lithium is in short supply, that is required in either case to produce the fusion fuel.




If nuclear-fusion power should miraculously become a practical possibility, its future would be limited by lithium being inherently a finite resource that is also required for numerous other applications. At the current production rates to meet the supply for numerous applications, the known worldwide resource of lithium will likely be depleted in roughly 400 years. 

In order to remove the needed lithium from seawater, for one tonne of fusion fuel that would produce 1 Gigawatt-year of energy under the most ideal circumstances, the processing of more than 10 million tonnes of seawater would be required. On the practical scale, this reads: Impossible!




The bottom line is, that nuclear-fusion energy-production will remain an unrealizable dream for far too many reasons. On almost all fronts fundamental barriers stand in its way. So, why would we pursue this dream at all then, especially if we don't need nuclear-fusion power anyway? We don't need it, even if it could be made workable, because the available cosmic electric energy that evidently exists, and is within our reach, exists on a scale in comparison that far supersedes all of our present and future energy-needs.




Efforts to overcome the energy resource limits.




On the front of nuclear fusion power, not a single success has been achieved.

The main blocking factor is that it takes a large kinetic force of energy to overcome the electric repulsion of the nuclei that must fuse for power extraction to become possible.

The extremely strong electric repulsion between the fuel nuclei prevents their atoms from merging.

While it is possible to force the fuel atoms to merge, with massive external energy being applied, the output energy that is achieved from the forced fusion is too feeble to cover the input energy needs for the fusion to happen, much less to produce a net energy-gain.




Enormous efforts have been made in recent times to develop a workable process to actually produce usable nuclear fusion energy. A gigantic experimental device is presently built in Europe, the ITER, that will stand a quarter as high as the great pyramid in Egypt, to explore ways to overcome the inhibiting problems.

It is deemed that if the process could be made successful, it would create a new energy resource of near infinite abundance. The evidence on this front, however, tells us that this great effort that has been ongoing for decades already, is a dead-end pursuit. 




No naturally occurring nuclear-fusion energy production is happening anywhere in the universe. The principle for such an energy-production process doesn't exist, nor is it needed as the universe is flush with electric energy streams. 




Natural barriers against nuclear fusion exist instead that protect the universe from destroying itself. Nuclear fusion is an energy consuming process in the natural world, by which atoms are formed. Nuclear fusion is not an energy creating process. 




The vast flash of energy that is released by a thermonuclear bomb is not the product of nuclear fusion. It is the product of latent energy being released when two overbuilt isotopes, deuterium and tritium, are violently forced to fuse in such a manner that a neutron, which has been previously bound to their nuclei becomes unbound, because it has no longer a place in the resulting fused product. The energy that is released in this process is essentially the product of nuclear fission, which too, merely releases previously invested, talented energy.




Nuclear fusion energy production doesn't work for three reasons. The energy level of the neutron that is released, which is the usable energy, is 100 times greater than in normal nuclear reactors. The strong neutron flux destroys the fabric of the metals that the reactors are made of. It also makes the reactors intensely radioactive. This hugely damaging effect is great for nuclear bombs that are designed to kill people, but it makes the process inherently useless for power reactors. 




Also the required fusion-fuel isotopes, deuterium and tritium, are hard to produce. Deuterium exists in seawater in a highly diluted ratio so that it takes the processing of 600,000 tons of sea water to extract enough deuterium for one ton of fusion fuel that would, if the process was workable, power a one-gigawatt reactor for a year. In order to replicate the current electricity production by this process, 2,500 times as much water would have to be processed for the needed fuel each year. This would be a gigantic requirement, if not a prohibitive one.




For tritium, the fuel situation is worse. Tritium doesn't exist naturally at all. It needs to be bred from lithium-6 in nuclear fission reactors, in an extremely slow process. Also the numbers don't add up for this process to make sense. It takes 1 tritium atom to produce 1 neutron in a fusion reactor, while it takes 1 neutron, irradiating lithium-6, to produce 1 tritium atom for the new fuel. This means that no net energy gain is actually produced in this process. Also, lithium-6 is quite rare. A mere 7.5% of natural lithium is lithium-6. Attempts are made to breed the needed tritium directly in the fusion reactor itself, from lithium-7, but if one considers the shielding required for the project to be workable, a reasonable success is near impossible. Nor will it ever be possible to capture all the fusion-released neutrons for self-sustained breeding to be realized.




In addition, it takes more energy input to create the brute force to cause the fusion to happen, than the fusion process gives back. No net energy gain has yet been achieved.

While fusion burns have been achieved in some of the largest reactors, the fusion process itself has an inherent flaw, which all by itself makes fusion power impractical. The flaw is that the fusion process blows itself out for reasons that the fusion fuel is being diluted with the resulting fusion product. The longest burn-time to date that has been achieved, was about 1 second.




A different approach to nuclear fusion power utilizes light to compress a tiny sphere of fusion fuel (image 1) with such immense power that its atoms begin to fuse. The fuel is placed inside a small hollow capsule made of gold (image 2). It is irradiated with 192 beams of light inside the hollow capsule (image 3). The irradiation occurs inside a 30-foot target chamber (image 5), where the capsule is precisely positioned relative to the light beams (image 4). 500 trillion watts of light is applied to the target from 48 directions in a gigantic facility, larger than a sports stadium, named the National Ignition Facility (image 6). The facility contains 192 large lasers that are designed to compress the fuel sphere at a velocity of 370 Kilometers per second. 

When fusion will be accomplished, which has not been achieved to date, the fusion power produced will be roughly one tenth of the power input required to cause the fusion to happen. Should ignition be achieved in the future, the fusion burn will be extremely short in duration, in the range of nanoseconds, with a 20 hour cooling-off period required between shots. Actual commercial power production simply cannot be achieved on this basis. Nuclear fusion power is a concept that started with a dream and will remain a dream.




The entire concept will remain a dream forever, because even if all the technical barriers against the power-production process could be overcome by some magic, the key element in the process, which is its fuel cycle, makes the concept ultimately an impossible dream.

The entire nuclear-fusion power development project is built on the neutron-heavy deuterium-tritium fuel. This neutron-heavy fuel is the only fuel that can be made to fuse with a reasonable amount of energy input.




Since the tritium isotope is double neutron-heavy, it doesn't exist naturally. It can be artificially created in a fission reactor that produces free neutrons that can be applied to fission lithium into in helium and tritium. 

It is here where the fuel cycle breaks down. A fusion reactor cannot breed its own fuel. It can breed some of it by the fissioning of lithium-6, but not enough, because the fission process to produce the tritium requires as many neutrons for its input than the tritium in the fusion process generates. Because of neutron capture inefficiencies, uranium fission reactors will always be required for the supplemental breeding of the fusion fuel. 




Uranium-235 is the only natural element in existence on earth that emits free neutrons. Every nuclear power reactor on earth utilizes the atomic fission characteristic of uranium that releases free neutrons. No other efficient natural source for free neutrons exist other than U233, U235, and U239 as are presently used in nuclear power production, which has a highly limited fuel resource.




A large nuclear power station with a net electrical capacity of 1,300 MW requires about 210,000 kg of raw uranium per year as input for the fuel production. At the current rate of uranium consumption the reserves in presently operating mines will be exhausted in 20 years. Presently unused economic reserves can extend the uranium supply for another 80 years. It is assumed that as yet undiscovered resources may exist that could extend the supply for another 300 years, and it is further assumed that presently uneconomic ores might extend the supply for possibly as along as 1,500 years. In theory, the uranium supply can never be depleted. The rocks of the Earth, even sea water contain trace amounts of uranium. But for all practical purposes, such as for large-scale power production, uranium is a finite resource that will likely be depleted for practical applications in a hundred years.




While it is possible to fission lithium-7 to produce tritium, shown as Case 2, high-energy neutrons are required for the fission to be possible. While a fusion reactor does produce high-energy neutrons that would fission lithium-7, in practice the two cannot meet. The shielding that is required of the lithium against the high thermal-flux of fusion reactions exceeding 100 million degrees, requires shielding materials that block the fast neutrons that the lithium-7 fission requires. Those materials do not exist at the present. It might be possible to produce them in the future, though little hope exists.

And on top of all that, the critical lithium is in short supply, that is required in either case to produce the fusion fuel.




If nuclear-fusion power should miraculously become a practical possibility, its future would be limited by lithium being inherently a finite resource that is also required for numerous other applications. At the current production rates to meet the supply for numerous applications, the known worldwide resource of lithium will likely be depleted in roughly 400 years. 

In order to remove the needed lithium from seawater, for one tonne of fusion fuel that would produce 1 Gigawatt-year of energy under the most ideal circumstances, the processing of more than 10 million tonnes of seawater would be required. On the practical scale, this reads: Impossible!




The bottom line is, that nuclear-fusion energy-production will remain an unrealizable dream for far too many reasons. On almost all fronts fundamental barriers stand in its way. So, why would we pursue this dream at all then, especially if we don't need nuclear-fusion power anyway? We don't need it, even if it could be made workable, because the available cosmic electric energy that evidently exists, and is within our reach, exists on a scale in comparison that far supersedes all of our present and future energy-needs.




Biomass fuels as a renewable energy resource?




The answer is NO! Bio fuels, as an energy resource, stand before us in principle as another unrealizable dream. The dream is essentially a lie.




Bio fuels are typically not a net energy producer. The physical process of distilling food into a motor fuels, with all the input energy accounted for that goes into the process, generates no appreciable energy gain, or extremely little, typically when manual slave type labour is involved. 




Biofuels are efficient only in producing genocide.




The biofuels process is in practice an expensive and wastefully energy conversion process that doesn't even reduce pollution, but doubles CO2 emissions and adds some substantially dangerous pollution of its own, such as ozone, and a number of carcinogens that are produced in ethanol combustion. The pollution is killing people in quiet invisible ways, especially in the cities where the pollution is concentrated.




Of course, the burning of food is also killing people with hunger and starvation.




Bio fuels are highly effective as a tool for inflicting genocide by the mass burning of food. The amount of food that is presently burnt would normally nourish 220 million people. Some estimates go as high as 400 million people. By burning vast quantities of food in a world that has a billion people living in chronic starvation, we are committing at least a hundred million people to death a year by slow starvation. 




We are not creating energy with the biofuels platform. Instead we are destroying the most valuable form of energy we have, which is the humanist energy that powers our industries, farming, science, and civilization as a whole. 




If we let go of this most precious energy, we loose ourselves - we imprison ourselves and our future with it, and we impose on us the death sentence of silent starvation.




The crisis is knowable. The facts are tragically plain. 




I have produced a video on the subject that explores the details more fully. Its title is: Mass Murder Biofuels, a Presidential Election Issue.




That the biofuels project is not an energy project, but is a politically motivated genocide project, is evident by the relentless refusal of the leaders of empire to lift the biofuels mandate in the face of increasing drought conditions, severe food shortages, and collapse in the farming and the food supply industries. 




Massive protests and petitions have been launched by numerous organization, all aiming to halt the burning of food to protect human nutrition. The petitions have all been rebuffed. 




Nor has the depopulation policy been lifted, which is designed to reduce the human presence on the Earth from the current 7 billion, to a mere 1 billion people.

Home page

Please consider a donation - Thank You

Published by Cygni Communications Ltd. North Vancouver, BC, Canada - (C) in public domain - producer Rolf A. F. Witzsche